January 1st, 2009 – Gigondas and Grenache

First wine of 2010 is….1999 Gigondas Le Grand Montmirail from Domaine Brusset. What a gorgeus Grenache, still fairly young, but lots of ripe cherry fruit surrounded by provencal herbs.
It reminds me how the same grape can taste so different when made in different countries. I love Grenache made in the Cotes du Rhone…Chateauneuf du Pape and Gigondas are two of my favourite wines (and relatively good values, too, for the cellar at under $50).
But one of the things I learned last year is that I don’t much care for the same grape from Spain (where it is called Garnacha). Not sure why…many critics (including Parker) rave about the old vine Garnachas, but there is something about them that doesn’t work for me. Maybe it is the oak…I can never taste the oak in the French ones (even though I know they are aged in it) but woodiness tends to overcome the fruit in the Spanish ones for me.
Or maybe it is the ripeness of the fruit…I also like Aussie Grenaches, which are similar in style to French ones, but a but jammier (maybe because super ripe from the heat).
Anyway, a reminder that style, in wine, varies and one of the reasons people like not just different wines, but different kinds of wines.
SB

First wine of 2010 is….1999 Gigondas Le Grand Montmirail from Domaine Brusset. What a gorgeus Grenache, still fairly young, but lots of ripe cherry fruit surrounded by provencal herbs.
It reminds me how the same grape can taste so different when made in different countries. I love Grenache made in the Cotes du Rhone…Chateauneuf du Pape and Gigondas are two of my favourite wines (and relatively good values, too, for the cellar at under $50).
But one of the things I learned last year is that I don’t much care for the same grape from Spain (where it is called Garnacha). Not sure why…many critics (including Parker) rave about the old vine Garnachas, but there is something about them that doesn’t work for me. Maybe it is the oak…I can never taste the oak in the French ones (even though I know they are aged in it) but woodiness tends to overcome the fruit in the Spanish ones for me.
Or maybe it is the ripeness of the fruit…I also like Aussie Grenaches, which are similar in style to French ones, but a but jammier (maybe because super ripe from the heat).
Anyway, a reminder that style, in wine, varies and one of the reasons people like not just different wines, but different kinds of wines.
SB

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