Value – What it Means and Where to Find It

Of all the ‘wine words’ out there, there is perhaps none that is harder to define than ‘value’.

Does it mean, for example, the best cheap wine? Or can you find value wines in all price categories? At the extreme, does that mean for Bordeaux – perhaps the most expensive of wines – can have value wines that cost $80, $90 or even a $100+++?

Well, a few thoughts on what value means to me. Personally, I associate the word mostly with mid-priced wines, say in the $15 – $20 range. Cheaper than that – and I drink lots that are cheaper than that on a regular basis — I tend to call them ‘cheap but good’.

The $20 – $30 category is a tricky one for me. For everyday drinking, I have a hard time thinking that there are any value wines here. Maybe it is the $20 barrier, or I don’t make enough money, or I am cheap…I don’t know! For my cellar, though, that is a whole different story. Wines that can age and develop over an 8 – 10 year period that cost less than $30 — I definitely see those as value cellar wines!

Over $30, I feel there are no everyday values. But the same rule as above applies to my cellar. I rarely spend more than $50 a bottle, so if I can find a highly rated Rhone, Italian, Californian or Australian wine with 10+ years ageability for $30 – $40, I see that as another cellar value.

Also starting at this price range, there are wines that I just don’t see as cellar values, regardless of the rating. Beaujolais, for example, or Malbec. Many BC wines fall into this category as well.

In the $40 – $60 range, all of the above applies, and value for me is tied very closely to a review. I follow Parker and have had good experience with his reviews. And I know that many 90+ rated wines cost from $50 – $100+++. So if I see a highly rated wine of a type that I like and know is usually expensive (and I can’t usually afford it), then I do consider that a cellar value.

Examples? Well, how about Barolo or Barbaresco or Brunello di Montalcino from Italy? Or Hermitage from the northern Cotes du Rhone? Or a reserve bottling from Chateauneuf du Pape or Gigondas? If I can get these wines for under $60 and their scores are 94 or 95+, then I also consider them values.

And over $60? Well, that doesn’t seem like value to me. I guess if I could find a 100 pt wine for $60 or $70 I might buy it, but I wouldn’t call it a value wine.

So that’s my view on value. In the weeks to come, I will give some actual examples — red and white — that fall into these categories.

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

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2 Responses to “Value – What it Means and Where to Find It”

  1. The Wine DOC(G) Says:
    • The Wine DOC(G) Says:

      Wow, tablets are a pain… Anyway, I know what you mean. I have friends who collect Bordeaux and Burgundy. Their perception of value I am sure is very different than ours. I track my cellar closely. Back in the mid 1990’s, my average bottle cost was $22. Now it is $38. Currently, 50% of my cellar was purchased under $30, 75% under $40. As our palates mature, I think most people tend to diversify our cellars. That is how I started buying premium Bordeaux, Barolo, Napa… now, that last 25% tends to drive my average bottle cost. Keep in mind, I used to buy all my wine from shops and supermarkets. Now, I purchase everything on auction, or from internet flash sites at deep discount. I think all of us with a wine cellar can relate to what you have said here and have had this discussion with ourselves. Just move the dollars around…

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