Does the Region on Your Wine Label Really Matter?

A bit of ‘wine buzz’ recently up here in BC around new or sub-regions in different parts of our Okanagan Valley, where the vast majority of our great wine is made. And that got me thinking – does this kind of identification really matter and, if so, why?

It’s certainly not new, of course! Bordeaux and Burgundy have led the way in this area for over a hundred years, breaking up their Crus — and even certain vineyards – based on differences that the French call terroir. And both Napa and Sonoma valleys in Cali have done it extensively over the past 40 – 50 years.

But back to my questions – does it matter, and if so, why?

There is no doubt that certain grapes grow differently in different soils and climates, producing different flavored wines. One has only to taste even a generic Bordeaux compared to a similarly priced Cali Cabernet Sauvignon to see that. So – from a consumer point of view – I can see the benefit if it is explained that way ie if you know the style of Cabernet or Chardonnay you like, that could help you pick out wine.

It could help winemakers too, of course. No use planting a varietal in soil/climate that won’t usually allow it to ripen fully on a regular basis. Hence the lack of Grenache in BC (which needs lots of sun and heat).

But there are two areas (no pun intended) where I get suspicious. The first is around sub, sub, sub regions. Does the wine really taste that different to justify that? Or is it just marketing and promotion…which brings me to my last concern.

If producers — or geographical areas, for that matter – are charging more because of a perceived quality difference, well…I’m not sure I agree. Even in Bordeaux and Burgundy you see Grand/Premier Cru wineries and vineyards in a range of different area. Promote the producer/wine as better – absolutely. But the region or sub-region?

The main reason for my argument comes back to the fact that everybody likes different styles of wine. The ones they like best they will think are the best…but that is for them. The opposite is also true. I have a friend who loves Bordeaux-style Cabernet as much as I dislike them, and actually traded me some Okanagan wines for them (which I love) for that reason.

So beware the wine region buzz! Focus instead on matching the style of wine you like with what is – or can – be made in whatever region you are in or tasting. That is a better way to help guarantee your enjoyment!

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

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