In Praise of Younger Wines

Okay, back after basketball, a bad cold and Spring Break…so what to write about? How about something I have never touched on before, and which I haven’t traditionally supported.

And that’s drinking your “cellar wines” when they are young?

As most know, the rationale for not doing this is that so-called “big red wines” can be tannic and harsh when young. Age – anywhere from 5 – 15+ years – can deal with this issue, as well as lead to the development of so-called secondary aromas and flavours.

But I had an amazing experience a couple of weeks ago that challenged this traditional approach!

I was looking to buy some special wine to celebrate an amazing accomplishment, wines that would mature over the years so could remember that event far into the future. In scanning the options at the wine store, I saw a candidate – the ’12 Cabernet Sauvignon 40th Anniversary by Caymus. Not cheap ($72), but rated 96 by Parker, a 20+ year development profile, and the fact that the wine itself was commemorating something! Then – intriguingly – some comments that suggested it was drinking very well now. Add in the fact I had recommended it to a client a while back for a dinner party (it was the star wine), and I decided to go for it. Two for the cellar, one to drink now.

The result? Well, I was gobsmacked!

As the review said, the wine was the essence of black currant liqueur – super ripe, but not sweet or jammy, super long finish, and any tannins were buried in the fruit. It was as good a wine — young or old – as I have ever had!

That’s what got me thinking – should I do this more often? The fruit was so tempting…

But the price! One of my rationalizations for buying cellar wine is I will pay more than my day to day wines (I try to stick to around $15) in order to enjoy them years later while mature and – if I could find them – when they would be two to three times the price. Without that rationalization in place, my whole wine strategy was kinda blown to pieces.

So what to do?

I still haven’t come up with a permanent answer to that question. One solution might be to ‘splurge’ once in a while on an everyday wine. Another might be to buy an extra bottle of cellar wine to try/drink right away.

Both obviously have financial implications. But they have ‘enjoyment’ implications as well!

Maybe something to keep thinking about?

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: