Posts Tagged ‘NkMip’

Wineries and Wines to Checkout at the 2017 VIWF

February 15, 2017

Okay, my annual “where to go/what to taste” at the Vancouver International Wine Festival evening tastings Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the Vancouver Convention Centre.

The “theme country” is Canada, so let’s start with us! All of these wineries are from my home province of BC:

• Averill Creek – great Pinot Noir from Vancouver Island winemaker Andy Johnston, and also check out their new sparkling wine
• Church & State – Coyote Bowl Syrah here, as well as their Bordeaux blend Quintessential
• Howling Bluff – Pinot Noir and the Semillon/Sauvignon Blanc blend
• La Frenz – best winery in Canada pouring great Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and outstanding red blend Grand Total Reserve
• Moon Curser – Bordeaux blend Border Vines and very nice Syrah
• Moraine – Pinot Noir, Syrah and Riesling
• NkMip – First Nations winery makes very nice Chardonnay and Pinot Noir

As for the rest of the world:

• Argentina – Zuccardi for Malbec/Malbec blends
• Australia – Inland Trading Company represents Cimicky, Kalleske and Massena reds
• France:
o J.M. Cazes makes nice Chateauneuf du Pape
o Chapoutier – world leader in Chateauneuf du Pape, Crozes Hermitage and a “cult” wine called Occultum
o Ferraton Pere – northern Rhone wines, including St. Joseph, Cornas and Crozes Hermitage
o Jean Luc Columbo – northern Rhone wines, particularly Cornas
o Louis Bernard – Chateauneuf du Pape, Vacqueyras
• Italy – Allegrini for red Veneto wines; Carpineto for Chianti and Vino Nobile; Rocca della Macie for Chianti and super- Tuscan Roccato
• Portugal – vintage ports from Fonseca and Taylor Fladgate
• California – Kendall Jackson Cabernet and Chardonnay; Signorello for Cabernet, Chardonnay and white blend Seta

That should keep you busy!

Enjoy, and don’t forget to spit…or this is way too much wine.

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

EASTER WINES TO HAVE WITH HAM, LAMB…OR SPAM!

April 16, 2014

Easter this weekend, and many will be looking for a wine – or wines – serve to family at a holiday meal. Everyone knows that the food plays a big role in picking the wine, so I thought I would offer some ideas on what to serve with some of the favourite Easter foods – ham and lamb (the spam was just a marketing gimmick to get your attention).

With ham, it really depends on how you are going to serve it. It is usually on the sweet side, with maple or sugar or any of those kinds of coatings, I would actually go for a white wine that also is a touch sweet. Rieslings or Gewurztraminers are great choices, even if they have just a touch of residual sugar, because they have big enough body – and enough fruit – to handle both the sweetness of the glaze and the meatiness of the ham. Germany and Alsace (from France) make the best ones, but if you have/come across the Small Lots by La Frenz from BC go for it! It is an amazing wine and, at about $20, a ridiculous bargain!

Wines for lamb follow the same kind of strategy, although there are savoury options as well. If it is a very “English” mint jelly kind of lamb, stick with the Riesling. But if you are going with the more French version – with mustard, rosemary and other herbs – there are lots of great red wine options!

Pinot Noir is one, especially if you can find one that has earthy and mushroom undertones to match the flavours in the lamb. Burgundy is the traditional place to go, but that can be very expensive and, frankly, unreliable (if I had a dollar for every expensive but disappointing red Burgundy I have had, I would be a rich man!). California can also be a source of good Pinot Noir, but – ironically – the ripeness of many of the wines can work against the lamb combo, with the almost candied cherry flavours coming off as too sweet for the meat and the flavoring.

My recommendation is from BC again – for some very special wines! Kettle Valley makes two of them – the Hayman Vineyard and the Reserve. The former is very “Burgundian”, with ripe dark cherry fruit but nice earth and mushrooms to go with it. The latter is a little more Californian, but still works. The other option is from Blue Mountain. Their Reserve Pinot Noir is a great Burgundy/Cali cross, especially as it ages! All these wines can be tough to find because they aren’t made in big quantities, but worth looking for. Other options almost as good include Pinot Noirs from Eau Vivre, Howling Bluff, Averill Creek and NkMip.

If not Pinot Noir, though, go for a Grenache-based wine from the Cotes du Rhone. The inherent lavender/rosemary aromas – called “garrigue” – are perfectly suited for lamb, as are the ripe but dried cherry flavours. Chateauneuf du Pape with six to eight years of age is a great bet, especially if it is from a first rate producer like Beaucastel, Clos du Papes or Le Vieux Donjon. But a younger Cotes du Rhone from a great vintage like 2010 or 2012 also will work.

And if spam is the Easter meal of choice? Well, if you are not drinking beer…pick the best wine you can find! It will make you forget about the food you are eating.

Happy Easter!

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

OKANAGAN SOUTH WINE TOUR

June 14, 2013

For most folks, BC wine country is the southern Okanagan, meaning Oliver and Osoyoos off of Highway 97 South. But don’t forget one other winery up at Okanagan Falls as well; you have to backtrack and/or make a detour for it, but it well worth the trip.

1. Blue Mountain

Yes, this is the one you have to backtrack for! And, yes, you can’t taste their best wine there, because the Reserve Pinot Noir sells out in a few hours upon release. But Blue Mountain is still well worth the effort, both for the beautiful drive through the vines (you will think you are in California) and the chance to taste some of their other very good wines.

White, red and sparkling are usually available for tasting and I recommend all of them. Chardonnay and Pinot Gris (regular and, sometimes, the Reserves) for the whites, Pinot Noir and Gamay (the latter perhaps the best in the province) for the reds and the best non-vintage sparkling wine as well.

Even though the Reserve Pinot Noir isn’t available to taste, a few words about it. You need to get on the mailing list for this beauty and then act quickly to get some of what is – along with Kettle Valley’s Hayman Vineyard – the best Pinot Noir in BC. A wine that tastes like California when young and Burgundy as it ages, it is just beautiful, full of dark cherry fruit, spice and earthy overtones. I like it best after 2 – 3 years in the bottle, but it drinks beautifully on release as well. And, in good vintages, it can age 8 – 10 years.

My other favourite wines at Blue Mountain are the sparkling ones, both non-vintage and vintage. The former – they make both a Brut and Brut Rose – are classic Cava-style sparklers, with ripe green apples (for the regular Brut) and strawberries (for the Rose). Both are medium bodied and bone dry, with beautiful, small bubbles. I haven’t tried to age them, but they are great on release and will impress any sparkling wine lover, especially for about $25.

The vintage Brut Rose, Brut and Blanc de Blanc aren’t always available, but are worth purchasing for those who like Champagne style sparklers. I have had the 2008, 2006 and 2005, respectively, and they would easily compete with Champagnes that are more than twice the price! You get that toasty/yeasty component characteristic of real Champagne, with the fruit older and complex. Definitely special occasion wines, and at less than $50, they easily rival real Champagne that costs $20 or $30 more.

2. Church and State

Okay, now it’s just down Highway 97 towards Oliver and Osoyoos, tasting along the way! First up on the eastern side of the highway is Church and State winery. The headquarters is actually based on Vancouver Island, but the majority of their vines – and best wines – come from the Coyote Bowl site in Oliver. A brand new, fancy tasting room is evidence of the winery’s success, which recently included “Wine of the Year” for their 2009 Coyote Bowl Syrah.

There are three different levels of wines to taste – Coyote Bowl, Church & State and Church Mouse (in descending order of quality and price). For whites, there are Rhone varietals as well as Chardonnays; I like the latter, made in a Cali-style. For reds, a full spectrum of Bordeaux varieties and blends, as well as Pinot Noir and Syrah. May favourites are the Coyote Bowl Syrah, C&S Hollenbach Pinot Noir and the Coyote Bowl Cabernet Sauvignon.

The Coyote Bowl Syrah is made in a Rhone style with smoky, peppery black cherries, this is the wine that made C&S famous when the 2009 won Wine of the Year in Canada. While not as good as the Nichol Syrah (and on par with the Burrowing Owl), it is still a very good wine for medium term drinking.

The Hollenbach Pinot Noir is made in the Cali-style, with ripe red cherries, earth and a touch of spice. It is smooth and medium bodied, meant for consumption over the first few years. At $27 it is more expensive than Eau Vivre, but cheaper than reference points like Kettle Valley and Blue Mountain. Quality wise it lags behind all of these, but the price is fair compared to California.

Finally, the Coyote Bowl Cabernet Sauvignon is actually more Bordeaux in style than California, although much riper (which is why I like it). Black currants, vanilla, herbs and cedar are the flavor components, and it can be a bit tannic when young, developing over 3 – 5 years. At $35 it is getting up there in price, but for the style it is price competitive with wines that are $10 – $20+ more.

3. Cassini Cellars

This winery on the west side of the highway was a revelation on my last trip to the Okanagan! Not only did the quality of their wines blow me away, but the prices had come down, making them extremely competitive. A big, spacious tasting room makes for a nice visit as well.

A full range of whites are available, including two Chardonnays (oaked and unoaked), Sauvignon Blanc and Muscat. I really like the Reserve Chardonnay, which is made in that classic buttery California style. For reds, there are the Bordeaux varieties and blends, Pinot Noirs (two of them) and a Syrah. All are worth tasting, although my favourites are the Syrah and Merlot (the latter sees little or no oak, is incredibly fruity and, at $18.95, may be the best BC red wine value!).

The Syrah, given the combination of quality and price (under $30), makes it a great choice for buying and drinking over a 4 – 5 year period. Very French, with peppery black cherries and a touch of licorice, it is ripe and shows little or no oak overtones. It sells out quickly though!

The Merlot is no herbal/mocha Merlot – instead, the dark plums literally jump out of the glass and there is almost no oak (half of the wine is aged in stainless steel). For drinking over the first few years of its life for its freshness, and even available in BC government liquor stores!

Finally, the Reserve Chardonnay isn’t cheap at $29, but the fruit is buttery, ripe but not sweet, medium bodied and has a great mouth feel. Drink it over the first few years to make sure the oak doesn’t get it!

4. Burrowing Owl

One of the most iconic (and beautiful) BC wineries, and the one that first showed me how good our red wines could be with the 1998 Merlot (which is still the best BC wine I have ever tasted!). Although the style of the red wines has changed since then – moving more towards Bordeaux and away from California – it is still a place worth visiting, tasting and – for the Syrah – buying!

A full range of red Bordeaux varietals are available for tasting here, although over the years I tend to focus on the Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon (the Cabernet Franc and Meritage have become too herbal and tannic for me). For the whites, the Chardonnay and Pinot Gris are both nice and still fairly reasonable priced.

The one wine that I recommend year in, year out, for buying at Burrowing Owl is the Syrah. It is make in that Rhone style, with peppery black cherries and an intriguing smokiness on the nose. The fruit is ripe but not jammy, and while it drinks nicely on release, it can develop in the bottle over 4 – 6 years as well.

5. Moon Curser

A relative newcomer to the BC wine scene, the former Twisted Tree Vineyards winery is producing reasonably priced, good quality red and white wines, including some intriguing white Rhone varietals you don’t usually see in the province. The winery is conveniently located just outside of Osoyoos, making for a quick and easy visit and tasting experience.

Stylistically, I prefer more of the Moon Curser red wines, specifically the Syrah, Malbec and Border Vines (their Bordeaux blend). The whites are worth tasting as well, although I am not a huge fan of Rhone varietals like Roussanne and Marsanne because of their resiny overtones. Having said that, the blend “Afraid of the Dark” – which mixes these varietals with Chardonnay – is both fruity and refreshing

The Syrah, at $25, offers excellent price/quality ratio here for a Rhone-style Syrah that features pepper, black cherries and more tannin than is normally found in this varietal. But there is also little or no wood evident and enough ripe fruit to let it develop for 4 – 5 years.

The Border Vines is the same price and offers the same value proposition, although it is perhaps even more impressive to me because it is a Bordeaux blend that is riper – and way cheaper – than most. Look for black currants here, plus some wood and herbs, but not enough of the latter to overwhelm the fruit. It is a bit tannic when young, so either decant for an hour or so, or give it a couple of years in the cellar.

6. Nk’Mip

Last but not least is Nk’Mip, a First Nations winery in Osoyoos that has made major strides in quality over the past few years to add to it’s great price structure. It is well worth a visit for both the white and red wines and – like Moon Curser – is conveniently located just outside of downtown Osoyoos.

I like both the Chardonnay and Riesling for the white wines, both attractively priced (at around $20) for regular drinking and widely available in BC Government liquor stores. Pinot Noir and Syrah are my picks for the reds, as the Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Meritage are more Bordeaux in style (although a new, more inexpensive blend called Talon was riper). There is the regular line of varietals, as well as reserve wines labeled Qwam Qmpt, which are the ones I buy for my cellar.

The Qwam Qmpt Pinot Noir, at $30, is a beautiful California style Pinot Noir that combines vanilla from the oak barrels with ripe red cherry fruit. Enjoyable on release, it also seems to age well from 3 – 4 years.

The same can be said of the Qwam Qmpt Syrah ($30), although I have only had a couple of vintages of this wine. Made in the classic Rhone style with peppery, black cherries and little or no obvious oak. Again, enjoyable on release but seems to age well for a few years.

Finally, the Qwam Qmpt Chardonnay ($25) is very well priced for reserve Chardonnay made in the Cali style. It has lovely buttery/vanilla citrus fruit, a luscious mouth feel and creamy finish. Not for long term cellaring, but it is gorgeous on release.

****

So there you have it – 6 wineries from the heart of BC’s Okanagan wine country to visit. There are many more along the way, but if you tight for time and/or looking for an efficient way to “do” wine country, you won’t be disappointed with these choices.

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

MOTHER’S DAY WINES

May 10, 2013

It’s Mother’s Day this weekend and while my Mom passed away long ago, I think about her every day…and the wines she might want to have with a special brunch, lunch or dinner! So here are a few for your consideration – bubbles, pink, white and red!

Bubbles

It’s hard to go wrong with sparkling wine for any meal on Mother’s Day (even breakfast, if you mix in a little fruit juice!). For those on a budget, my “go to” wine remains the Segura Viudas Non Vintage Brut. This classic Spanish cava is full of crisp, green apples while still completely dry. And it is a bargain at about $16. For a BC version, the best remains Blue Mountain’s Non Vintage Brut or Brut Rose. At $24.95 (available from the winery or private stores), it is a step in quality but has the same cava aromas and flavours. Finally, if you want real Champagne, you can’t go wrong with Bollinger, the favourite wine of James Bond! Although expensive (even the Non Vintage Brut is $70 – $80), that yeasty, toasty style just exudes “special occasion”.

Pink

Rose is another good option for Mom, especially if the weather is already warm. There are two general kinds, and I prefer the ones with a little residual sugar (that leaves them just a touch off dry). The best in BC is from La Frenz – it is usually full of super ripe strawberries and red grapefruit, about as good a patio experience as you can find. Another option, more widely available, is from Quail’s Gate, which is not quite as fruity but made in the same style. Chill until very cold and then serve on the deck all day long!

White

The white wine I remember my Mom liking was a Premier Cru Meursault from Burgundy (on the rare occasions I could afford to serve it!). A couple of more reasonable – and available – options, though, come from California and B.C. One of the benchmarks for Cali-style Chardonnay (meaning vanilla/butter covered citrus, luscious mouth feel and medium body) is Beringer’s Private Reserve Chardonnay. Not cheap – at $45 – $50 – it is still worth it, an incredibly indulgent wine that is great on its own or with rich sauces. From BC, the recent Reserve Chardonnays from La Frenz are also made in this style (at $32), as are those from Cassini Cellars ($29) and Nk’Mip (the Qwam Qmpt for $30).

Red

For red, a couple of options. I’m not sure if my Mom liked Pinot Noir (she preferred bigger red wines), but it is always a popular option. I would stay away from Burgundy because of cost and quality variability, and go to BC instead. Kettle Valley (Hayman and Reserve) and Blue Mountain (Reserve) make the best in BC – they are full of red and black cherries, spice and earth. While not cheap (at $35 – $40) or widely available (the winery or private wine stores), they are definitely special occasion wines.

The other option – which I know my Mom liked – was Zinfandel, and not the pink kind! Go for the best if you are going to serve this super ripe wine full of blackberry jam and herbs, which means Ridge Vineyards in California. My two favourites are the Lytton Springs and Geyserville, both of which are predominantly Zinfandel and about $50 a bottle. You won’t need more than a glass or two, as they tend to be higher in alcohol, but are a great drinking experience.

So Happy Mother’s Day to all out there!

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

A Quick Guide to the 2013 Vancouver International Wine Festival

February 27, 2013

Hard to believe it is that time again, but the 2013 Vancouver International Wine Festival is on this week! With 176 wineries pouring over 600 wines, it can be a pretty intimidating evening of tasting, to be sure. So here is a quick guide to some of my recommended wineries and wines.

California

California was the only winery represented at the initial festivals, and it is great to see them back as the feature wine area! While prices have soared in the past years, the quality – and ripeness – of many wines continue to be very high. Here are five wineries to visit:

1) Antica Napa Valley – a venture by the Antinori family of Italy, this relatively new winery is producing fabulous Cabernet Sauvignons and Chardonnays
2) Joseph Phelps – one of the most reputable and established wineries in California, Phelps is justifiable famous for its Cabernet Sauvignon-based wines, especially its Insignia blend
3) Paul Hobbs – another relatively new winery, but Paul Hobbs has been growing grapes/consulting for cult producers for years. Try his Cabernets, Chardonnays and Pinot Noirs
4) Ridge Vineyards – one of my favourite wineries, led by legend Paul Draper. A Zinfandel specialist – check out their Lytton Springs and Geyserville bottlings – Ridge also makes very nice Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay
5) Wagner Family of Wine – the new name for the winery that makes Caymus (among other wines), and go to taste the Caymus Cabernet Sauvignons. Year in, year out, they represent all that is great about California Cabernet – super ripe black currant fruit, just enough wood, and the structure to age well!

Argentina

Not as many wineries as in past years, but still a few that make really nice Malbec (the signature grape of Argentina). If you only go to one winery, visit Catena Zapata, which makes rich, ripe Malbecs in all price ranges, as well as some nice Cabernets and Chardonnays.

Australia

Disappointing to see so few Australian producers this year; not sure why (they are among my favourites). Of those attending, I would recommend visiting Gemtree Vineyards (nicely valued Shiraz), Inland Trading Company (they own Turkey Flat Vineyards, which can make great old-vine Shiraz) and Yalumbia, which makes the full range of wines (I particularly like their Grenaches).

British Columbia

By comparison, I was very happy to see so many BC wineries attending, including some of my favourites. That includes Averill Creek from Vancouver Island (Andy Johnson makes amazing Pinot Noir in Duncan), Blue Mountain (not sure if they will have their Reserve Pinot Noir, but it is one of the two best made in BC; also try their Gamay and Sparkling Wine), and NkMip Cellars (a First Nations winery making very good Pinot Noir and Syrah).

France

I am also disappointed by the low number of French wineries this year! Even so, there are a couple of very good ones from the Rhone Valley – Chateau de la Gardine and Les Halos de Jupiter (both of which make very nice Chateauneuf du Pape). And, of course, the Perrin Family, which makes perhaps my favourite wine – Chateau de Beaucastel Chateauneuf du Pape – as well as great Gigondas, Cotes du Rhones Villages and others.

Italy

Italy has also sent a smaller than usual roster of wineries (am I sensing a trend here?). Worth checking out, however, are the Chianti Riservas from the likes of Antinori (as well as their Tignanello if they have it), Fontodi, Ruffino and Rocca della Macie.

Portugal

Finally, a great way to end the evening is with some Port! Three of the “biggies” are there – Taylor Fladgate, Fonseca and Croft – so it will be interesting to see if they bring any of their vintage wines.

So have a great time at the festival! My final advice, as is the case every year, is two-fold – spit if you can (to avoid getting drunk) and get out of the way once you’ve tasted (to avoid causing a line-up).

SB

http://www.sbwinesite.com

PS I will once again be “tweeting” my Festival experience, so feel free to follow me at @sbwinepage.